NaBloPoMo’10: Friday Five for November 26, 2010 – Holiday Music

  1. What’s your favorite holiday album?
    Last year, I discovered Ultra Lounge’s Best of Christmas Cocktails, which is totally awesome.  But, much like my father, I am a folksy kind of gal and my two favorite Christmas albums are  Christmas on the Mountain, and Hammered Dulcimer Christmas.
  2. What song’s lyrics, title, or theme best expresses the positive aspects of your general mood at this time of year?
    First, I’m going to say that I only go to church at Christmas, and the only things I sing during that mass are the Christmas carols.  My favorite, fill-you-with-the-spirit-of-the-season carol is I’m going to say that my favorite Christmas song ever is Joy to the World.
    We spend so much of the season in the dark and the cold that the lightness and brightness and sheer power of joy from that song is what it means to celebrate (in my case, totally secular) Christmas.  Laughing and feasting and light and warmth.  That song is it!
  3. What song’s lyrics, title, or theme best expresses the not-so-positive aspects of your general mood at this time of year?
    Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas from the musical Meet Me in St. Louis.
  4. What’s your favorite song about a non-December holiday?
    Um…Thriller, I guess…. Weird question.
  5. What holiday song makes you want to cover your ears and flee?
    When I worked for Heinen’s they subscribed to the prescribed satellite holiday station.  There was one song in a 9-hour shift that would cut through the noise of the cash registers, the customers, and the refrigerators when I was working in the back.  The opening chord of this song and the chorus reached that one spot in your brain that screaming children and nails on a chalkboard could hit.  It’s simple insipidness knows no rival to me, even in a musical word in which Justin Beiber exists.  Every single sphincter-type muscle in my body cringes when I hear it.
    That song is Wonderful Christmastime by Paul McCartney.
    It is my firm belief that The Beatles broke up because they knew Paul McCartney would eventually sing that song, and they wanted to put as much distance between themselves and that musical travesty as possible.  Yoko had nothing to do with it.

Source: Friday5.org

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